Thank you

Thank You

I know I’m in pain, but you might have it worse.

I can writhe and close my eyes, but you have to watch it.

You glance over helpless or turn your head away, because this is something you can’t fix.

I’m not the girl you fell in love with, I may be a wreck now but you married me healthy.

If you want to leave, you’re not letting it show.

Instead you gather my meds and bring me to the doctors.

Trying to help the only ways you know how, and it’s everything to me.

I toss and turn all night, thrashing around in pain.

I may be keeping you awake as pain steals sleep from us both.

You may have it worse. Helpless, hopeless.

Pain demeans us both, in different ways.

I don’t know how you deal with this.

Watching your loved one suffer and fade away.

I’m half the girl I used to be, and you’re twice the man I could have ever hoped for.

 

Thank You.

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thanks

A Love Letter To My Illnesses

This may sound weird, shocking, even wrong. Who thanks an illness that, from the outside (and sometimes inside), appears to have ruined their life? I do.

These illnesses have changed my life but I don’t believe they’ve ruined it. And here’s why.

Dear Rheumatoid Arthritis, Fibromyalgia, Degenerative Disc Disease, and Others,

I am writing this letter to thank you for how you’ve changed my life.

Before you I was a selfish person. I went through my life with a sort of self obsessed confidence. I was carefree and eagerly focused on my career and my shopping habits. Gossiping and drama were the center of my days while I should have been aware of the real world instead of my narcissistic universe. I would get enveloped in everything that did not actually matter.

When I began feeling pain everywhere I was angry. I know this sounds like a natural response to a body that is failing an otherwise healthy 25 year old woman, but I was filled with bitterness that was unbecoming of my prior bubbly self. I pushed through, because that’s what I did back then, not knowing that I was further wrecking my already damaged spine. My broken body fueled the drama that was my work (and home) life.

After my first spine surgery I began my Tumblr blog and found my place among the Spooniverse. I had no idea this was even a thing. I had no idea that there were so many illnesses and people like me, suffering with  bodies failing young women and men around the world. It shook my egocentric self to the very core. This was so much larger than myself! Through this I realized there were people in far worse shape than I was! There were warriors fighting courageous battles with smiling faces and I was moved by their spirits.

It gave me faith that I could do that, too. I could smile through my challenges and brighten people’s lives, and open their minds and hearts. I could look outside of my own problems and dedicate my life to helping others get through their days, weeks, and months. I could support and mentor new spoonies like I was (and still am!) supported and mentored by powerful, inspirational warriors!

It was around this time when I took stock of my life. I looked around and fell even more in love with my friends and family. They stood by me through my ups and downs, my good times and bad, my selfishness and my thoughtfulness. It was their love and support that propelled me to where I am now. It was their hours spent arranging pillows and filling pill cases and attending chronic pain workshops. And if it wasn’t for them I wouldn’t be the person I am today.

Throughout this whole experience I have been changed. I never knew how strong I was before you took over my body and made it your own. You have affected every aspect of my life and altered my reality and future. I no longer know what tomorrow will bring, let alone the next month or year, but I know I will get through it. You may be trying to break me, but you won’t. I am loved and supported and cared for by people who I never would have met if it weren’t for you. You thought you were ruining my life but you have enriched it in ways I never could have imagined.

So, dear illnesses. You have changed me. And for that, I am entirely grateful.

Thank you,

Courtney

Also, check out the Song of the Week page for an upbeat jam!

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friends

How to be a Friend to Someone in Chronic Pain

Good Evening!

Branching out from my regular style of upbeat musings on my life, I would like to take this time to provide some helpful hints to readers who are unsure how to be a friend to someone who lives with chronic pain.

I’d like to start by saying that my friends are amazing, and while the majority of them do not have chronic pain themselves they are all wonderfully supportive of my needs.
That being said, I know many people who struggle with making friends who fully grasp the gravity of their illnesses so I am hoping this can be a guide to promote understanding and happiness.

How to be a Friend to Someone in Chronic Pain

  1. We want understanding, not pity.
    When we complain about our illnesses or pain we are not looking for pity. The truth is, we are in pain all the time and the fact that we are not mentioning it all day, every day, means that when we do bring it up it’s worse than normal. We may be bringing it to your attention because we feel bad that we are not able to follow through on plans or so you are aware in case we are out of touch for a little while. We are looking for your understanding and support, not pity.
  2. We may not be able to make plans in advance and that has to be okay.
    Our health is so unpredictable. We never know how we are going to feel from day to day, let alone week to week. We can, quite literally, “pencil you in” for dinner sometime next week with the understanding that if our health is not cooperating we may have to reschedule. We call this a “pain check” instead of a “rain check”. We understand how terribly inconvenient this is and appreciate your understanding more than we could say.
  3. We may not be as available as we would like to be.
    Sometimes we are unable to talk on the phone or text as much as we would love to for a number of reasons. One reason is that talking on the phone can be overwhelming or even painful for some chronic pain fighters. Texting non stop can cause our chronic fatigue to flare and hurt our hands and joints. We would love to chat, however short the conversation may be! We appreciate you checking in on us!
  4.  We’re the same people we always have been, but we’re different, too.
    This may sound contradictory and confusing, and it is for us also. Pain changes people. We’re not the same people we were when we started this journey and our priorities may have shifted a bit, but we’re still the friends you fell in love with. We can rock a Netflix marathon or gossiping session like nobody’s business and chronic pain warriors have the best blankets, pillows, and snacks you’ve ever seen.
  5.  Our bodies may not let us do some of the activities you’re interested in.
    We don’t want to be left out, but we can’t partake in extreme activities anymore. These activities may include concerts, sky diving, marathon running, or day trips to Cedar Point. This breaks our hearts. It kills us to say no, but we’re not being a “downer” or a “kill joy,” we’re just not healthy anymore. Please have fun and we will live vicariously through you! Let us know when you want to chill and colour. We’re down for that.
  6. If you have any questions about our illnesses, ask us!
    It’s not a secret you need to tiptoe around. We’d love for you to ask questions! The more questions you ask, the more we explain, the more you understand and the happier we will all be! We know you may feel awkward asking about the ins and outs of our illnesses, but we are totally ready and willing to answer whatever you want to know.
  7. You may see us arrange pillows and pop medications like it’s our day job. It is.
    Taking care of ourselves is our job. We definitely have a method to our madness, and trust us, all of these things keep us alive and functioning. Yes, we may have more medications than a pharmacy and more pillows than Bed, Bath & Beyond, but each medication and pillow serves a purpose. Bonus points are awarded to friends and family who give us pillows or help us arrange them. It can be exhausting work!
  8. Any offer of help is appreciated.
    We adore helpful friends! Even if it is something small like hanging out with us for an hour, bringing us coffee, or grabbing something on a low shelf, we appreciate it! Larger offers like helping with dinner, helping with household tasks, or errand running is above and beyond! We are so thankful for your support and can’t imagine life without you!
  9. You are the best friends in the world.
    And we love you!

Thank you!

 

Your friendly neighbourhood Spoonie,

Courtney

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That Moment When

Good Afternoon Spoonies/Spoonie Supporters/Friends Who Stumbled Across My Page!

Here are some moments I’ve experienced and maybe you have, too!

That moment when you wake up in agony but can’t move to get your medication so you lay silently with tears streaming down your face until someone wakes up to get them for you or you gain the strength to reach your medicine dispenser. (more…)

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